Fouling

Chemical fouling inhibitors

Chemical fouling inhibitors are products that are mixtures of fouling and corrosion inhibitors use in boiler feedwater treatment. Several of the these products use aliphatic polyamines to coat the surface of pipes.

Helamin

Helamin is a boiler feedwater treatment based on amines and polyamines.[1] Helamin is a registered trademark of Helamin Technology Holding SA, Switzerland. Patents have been obtained for Helamin products, and in 2016, the following patents exist: EP1045045, JP4663046, HK1032080, BR9903614. Chemically, most of the Helamin types are stated by the manufacturer to be a “mixture of polyamines and polycarboxylates in aqueous solution”, but some also utilize volatile amines, ammonia, polyelectrolytes, organic polymers, and scavengers of dissolved oxygen.

In contrast to the conventional method of the water treatment, its action is based on a preventive protection of the surfaces. Helamin forms a film (i.e., is one of numerous available “filming amines”), which prevents corrosion and fouling on the water-side walls in steam boilers and piping systems, due to the affinity of Helamin to metal and oxide surfaces. Crystals which form in the presence of Helamine are isolated, so that they do not tend to group themselves. Thus deposit consolidation is inhibited. Already existing oxide surface deposits are gradually removed. In the boiler, a fine, liquid mud, which is easier to remove from the boiler walls, develops.

Helamin does not significantly decompose even at high temperature and pressure employed in the modern sub-critical -water power-plant boilers[citation needed]. Helamin treatment can be successfully employed in steam generators, warm and hot water piping systems, superheaters, as well as cooling circuits to mitigate some of the difficult problems of the corrosion and fouling. However, cation conductivity of water tends to increase with the use of Helamin.[1]

Fineamin

Fineamin is a water treatment technology based on amines and polyamines. The name of the technology is a registered trademark of h2o facilities SA, Geneva, Switzerland.[citation needed] Chemically, the Fineamin treatments are described by the manufacturer to be a “mixture of polyamines and polycarboxylates in aqueous solution”, but some also utilize volatile amines, ammonia, polyelectrolytes, organic polymers, and scavengers of dissolved oxygen.

Fineamin forms a film (it is one of numerous available “filming amines”), which prevents corrosion and fouling on the water-side walls in steam boilers and piping systems. This happens because Fineamin has an affinity to metal and oxide surfaces. Crystals which do form in the presence of Fineamin are isolated, so that they do not tend to group themselves. Thus deposit consolidation on the metal surface is inhibited. Already existing oxide surface deposits are gradually removed. Boiler develops a fine liquid mud, which is easy to remove from the system.

Fineamin does not significantly decompose even at high temperature and pressure employed in the modern sub-critical -water power-plant boilers[citation needed]. Fineamin treatment can be successfully employed in steam generators, warm and hot water piping systems, superheaters, as well as cooling circuits to mitigate some of the difficult problems of the corrosion and fouling. However, cation conductivity of water tends to increase with the use of Fineamin.[2] The treatment also has an alkalizing effect on the boiler feed water and steam (the pH is maintained at optimal values).

Fineamin is certified by TÜV[citation needed]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Bursik, A. (2004). “Polyamine/Amine Treatment – A Reasonable Alternative for Conditioning High Pressure Cycles with Drum Boilers” (PDF). Power Plant Chemistry. 6 (9): 549–555. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-10-09. 
  2. ^ A.Bursik, “Polyamine/Amine Treatment – A Reasonable Alternative for Conditioning High Pressure Cycles with Drum Boilers”, Power Plant Chemistry, 2004,(6)9. http://www.ppchem.net/issues/09-04.php

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